Tag: play

Hannah on Globber Scooter in the park Blog

My Sunday Photo – Scooter in the Park

My Sunday Photo for this week is of Hannah’s first ride of her scooter in the park

On Friday, Hannah’s new Globber scooter arrived (you can read my first impressions post here). naturally, that meant that we were destined to spend a large portion of our weekend on the local bike tracks.

It was a slow start to Hannah’s scooting career, mainly due to a reluctance to don a helmet, but once we got going, there was no stopping her (at least until she’d had enough of the helmet again)!


Hannah with Globber scooter ride in park helmet


Hannah covered a solid distance for her first ever go! I would estimate it at about a kilometre in total of riding. She also then walked a further half a kilometre when she decided that she wanted to be like mum and push the scooter by the handlebars. No wonder she was tired by the time we left the park.


Globber scooter in the park pushed by toddler


Hannah was happy to push herself along for a little while, but the squeals of joy really came out when I started pushing with a bit of speed! She loved experimenting with her feet by dragging them along the ground, or placing her foot on the wheel to feel the movement (see the picture below). I don’t think that pair of socks will ever be the same. As for the shoes, they may not be long for this world…


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Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 Scooter – First Impressions

A few weeks ago I wrote about Hannah’s frustrations at the playground with other children’s scooters. Every time she saw an unattended one, she was drawn to it like a magnet. It was obvious to Emma and I that it was time for Hannah to learn to ride. Thankfully, we weren’t the only ones who felt that way. The awesome crew at Globber read that post and they felt that they had the perfect scooter for Hannah – the Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter.

Today, that scooter arrived. Conveniently, the delivery came while Hannah was having her usual nap. That gave me a few moments to put the new ride together and to have a close look.


Quality – Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter

Regular readers of Blog of Dad know that quality is very important to me. Years of wasted money spent on cheap products that just don’t last have taught me that quality is half of the value equation (along with price). My first impression of the Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter is that it is a well-constructed, quality piece of gear.

The first thing that I noticed when it was delivered was that the box had some weight to it. Not so much that it would be unwieldly for a small child to use, but enough to fill me with confidence that it wasn’t some kind of cheaply made plastic-fantastic.

Upon opening the box, I could see where that weight came from. The scooter came in five separate parts, each one made out of metal or sturdy-feeling moulded plastic.


Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter in box


I quickly built the scooter. The instructions in the provided booklet were fairly basic, but they weren’t really even needed. The Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 was intuitive and easy to put together.

I stood back and admired my handy work. The Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter is a pretty spectacular piece of equipment, especially in the hot pink. Hannah will certainly be seen coming as she flies down the bike track at the park!


Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter side view


I gave the scooter a little push around the living room. All three of the wheels glided smoothly over the tiled floor. It took a little while to get used to the steering. The two front wheels are attached to ball bearing-mounted directional pivots, but they don’t “turn” as such. In the configuration where the scooter is controlled by a parent pushing, I often found myself having to lift the handle up, which brought the rear wheel off the ground. Once I had figured that out, I was able to get the scooter to pivot on the spot. I imagine that this will be less noticeable out on the wide-open bike tracks of the local park.


Versatility – Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter

The Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter has three main configurations – parent-propelled sitting, self-propelled sitting, and standing. The name 5-in-1 appears to come from further variations to these configurations (handlebar hight adjustment). As this is all very new to Hannah, I set her new ride up in the parent-propelled, sitting position.


Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter handlebars


I really like the versatility of this design. It means that we should be able to get many years of use out of it. According to the advertised specifications, the scooter can hold 50kg in the standing position. Again, it comes back to the idea that this scooter is built to last. It will grow with Hannah and help transition her from passive rider to actively in control. Not that she plans to be passive for long…


Toddler Magnet – Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter

As I said at the start, Hannah was fast asleep when the package arrived. Imagine her surprise when she came downstairs after her nap and saw this glorious pink, grey and black contraption sitting right there on her play mat! The same type of contraption that she had been so highly coveting EVERY SINGLE TIME we went to the playground in the past few months.

She sat in her high chair and drank her milk (nothing gets in the way of her after-nap milk), but she was pretty quick to discard the accompanying biscuit. Hannah demanded to be released from her high chair, and it was no surprise where she went immediately following her release. The shiny new scooter had all of her attention and, unlike at the park, she was free to touch it.


Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter rear wheel


Hannah hesitated for a second. She had been told all too often over the past month that she was not allowed to touch these things. But the reality of the situation quickly dawned on her. This was one of her very own. She was allowed to touch it! Even better, she was allowed to sit on it!

Hannah began to clamber aboard. The set-up was pretty easy for an 18 month old to understand (although she did initially try to mount it backwards). She needed a little help to begin with – I had to hold the handlebars to stop the scooter from moving as she climbed on.

Within seconds she was on, and all-too-late I realised my mistake. Once Hannah was aboard, there was no getting her off. Not only that, but to compound my mistake I began pushing her around the living room. I figured that was the end of any independent play for the afternoon – so long pile of washing that I was supposed to fold, good luck dishwasher that needed emptying. None of that was getting done now. For the rest of the afternoon, my life had a single purpose, to push an ecstatic toddler around the living room on her new favourite object.


Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 seat


Every time that I stopped pushing, a loud protest was issued. How dare I ruin the fun?

That was until Hannah realised she had the power of self-propulsion. Never one to stay too passive, Hannah soon figured out that she could run her feet along the ground and in doing so, gain control of the beast. Just like that I was released from my pushing duties. I was free to return to folding washing while at the same time keeping an eagle eye on Hannah as she explored her new device. She wasn’t too hard to observe – she hadn’t yet figured out how to turn the thing, so she had a pretty limited range.


Safety First

If the wild Sydney winds don’t stop us, it’s pretty certain that we will spend a decent chuck of this weekend at parks with great bike tracks. My first task for tomorrow morning will be to head down to the shops and buy a helmet. It is important to remember that even on a well-designed unit like the Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter, there is an inherent degree of risk. After all, that’s actually part of the fun.

Even with the stability of three wheels, the scooter has the potential to tip, or Hannah may simply just fall off. A helmet is an absolute must, as will be very close supervision. I think the ability for a parent to control the movement of the scooter via the attached handlebars goes a long way to mitigating some of that danger in the learning phase.


Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter


Stay tuned…

As soon as we manage to get the Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 into the wild (the bike track), I’ll report back. I’m itching to get outside and give it a propper go, and judging by the amount of attention Hannah is giving the scooter, so is she! Hopefully the Sydney August winds ease up just a little bit so that we can get out and about.


Disclosure – Globber provided Blog Of Dad with this scooter free of charge, for the purpose of review. The views expressed in this post are entirely my own views. They are based on my experiences with the Globber MyFREE 5-in-1 scooter. For further information, please visit my disclosure page.

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The Train Lives Blog

The Train Lives!

Regular readers may remember the devastating events of a few days ago, where a large amount of water was accidentally used to drown one of Hannah’s favourite toys – her battery-powered train. At the time, it appeared as if the train was well-and-truly ruined. The circuits shorted, controls rendered useless by the unfortunate spillage.


At the time, I proclaimed that:


I’m no electrical engineer, but I’m pretty sure that water-induced short-circuits are irreversible – Dad, 2017


It turns out I was absolutely correct… about not being an electrical engineer.


The Moment of Truth

Last night, in an act that some may describe as desperately optimistic, I retrieved the crippled train from its resting place on a high shelf in the laundry. I had placed it there on the night of “the incident”, in the vain hope that a good drying would magically fix the problem of the haywire circuit. I know, it sounded stupid to me at the time as well.

Except that it wasn’t. Through some kind of electronic wizardry, the favourite toy fired into life as if it had never received its impromptu shower.

I held my breath. Could it be possible? Could the simple process of fully drying the train have been enough to save it from becoming yet another burden on the local landfill?

I pressed a button. It did exactly as it was supposed to. There was no random noise, no sudden start-stop of the wheels. I pressed another button. Another prefect performance of its allocated task.

The final test remained – the smoke-stack. In the moments after the drenching, the smoke-stack refused to register at all. It appeared to be the key source of all the issues.

I took a few deep breaths. A bead of sweat formed on my brow. This was it. This was the moment. Would the train miraculously work as it was supposed to, or would my dreams come tumbling down in a landslide of malfunction?

The previous eight months flashed before my eyes – the excitement of Christmas Day, the joy on the grandparents’ faces, the first time Hannah explored the functions of her new toy, and every press of every button between then and now.

I closed my eyes and pushed down on the green stack.

“1,2,3, chug along with me!” exclaimed a familiar female voice. On it went as the wheels began spinning.

I opened my eyes and looked on in amazement. The train performed its act, as if nothing had ever happened. I pressed the stack again. As it had always done, the song and wheels abruptly stopped with the accompanying hissing sound of a steam locomotive stopping at a station.

I pressed the stack again and once more, off it went, this time on an ABC song.

The train lives! It is as good as it has ever been!

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Is My Toddler Ready for Childcare?

We are currently attempting to navigate our way through the dilemma that many modern parents face – should we send our toddler to childcare?

Next year she will turn two and we are aware that as she gets older, her need for social interaction with other children grows. While she gets some of this a the local park, a regular place in a childcare centre, in which she can begin to develop friendships with familiar people is becoming more attractive. Also, the exposure to trained early childhood educators can’t hurt.

But is Hannah ready? It’s a big change to spend time away from family and around people who are (at least to begin with) complete strangers. Hannah can, at times come across as shy. She sometimes hides her face when in new environments or when surrounded by unfamiliar people. At other times Hannah is playful and engaging. She has shown an interest in other kids.

To get a feel for what to expect, Emma and I organised to visit some of our local centres. While each one was vastly different (this is a topic for a whole different post) one thing was for sure – Hannah would be quite at home in any of them.

Some of the moments throughout the day that made us feel confident Hannah is ready for childcare…


Join the queue

We were standing in a brightly-lit hallway at the first childcare centre. As the director waxed lyrical about the difficulties that some two year-olds have with adjusting to the setting, she seemed completely oblivious to the actions of Hannah. She had watched a door open and a small army of toddlers file out into the hallway.

Hell-bent on joining them, Hannah had squirmed out of my arms and run the length of the hallway. She neatly joined the back of their line as they headed out the door leading to the outdoor play area. I left Emma and the director chatting away to rescue Hannah, moments before she had crossed the threshold and was part of the day’s activities for good. I returned to the conversation, holding a madly kicking little girl. Given half a chance, Hannah was ready to join in. She didn’t even think twice about glancing back to her parents to say goodbye.


Let me in

At the second childcare centre, Hannah was even more determined to join the fun. She wriggled her way out of my arms early on and made a beeline for the outdoor play area. She stood and looked longingly at the children playing on the other side of the fence, until a kind-hearted centre educator took pity on her and invited us to come on over and join in. I opened the gate and Hannah was off. Again, she didn’t think to look back. She suddenly had unfettered access to a yard full of kids, some younger, some older and some her age.

As is Hannah’s way, she soon found an older girl who took her under her wing and looked after her as she climbed the nearest balance beam. Hannah then abandoned her new friend and went to join a young boy who was sitting on the ground, spinning a contraption. He happily allowed her to join in, and together they spun the device around and around, until more kids came over and joined in.

Hannah eventually left that party and went to play by herself in the sandpit. She finally walked over to a seesaw, which she happily operated by herself for a few minutes. The whole time, she never once looked around to see where I was. I could have dropped her and run, and as long as someone fed, changed and played with her, she wouldn’t have cared one bit.


Must be getting hungry

By the time we visited the third childcare centre, we were feeling pretty good. Hannah had demonstrated enjoyment and a willingness to explore without direct parental supervision. We were surprised by how comfortable she had felt in both places. Nothing, however, had prepared us for her next demonstration of her willingness to attend childcare.

The director of the third centre was taking us on a tour and we entered the 0-2 room. Seated at a small table on little chairs, and on an assortment of high chairs was a gaggle of babies and toddlers. At first I was slightly disturbed. They were all sitting silently and looking directly at us. Obviously they were waiting for lunch and well-used to the drill.

Hannah, however, did not know what was going on. She looked at the other children then looked up at us. She grinned a big grin, then toddled over to the table, pulled the one remaining seat out and sat herself down with the rest of the kids. There she sat, a big grin on her face. She looked at the little girl next to her who shot back a similarly toothy smile. Hannah was in her element. She had no idea what was going on, yet she assessed the situation and summed it up perfectly. It was clear that her thought process was “if everyone else is sitting, I should too”.

I delicately removed Hannah from the table and we continued on our tour. She diligently waved goodbye to the other kids and the various staff, who had just begun bringing out food. I heard the now familiar “she’s sooo cute!” whispered from one educator to another as we headed out the door.

When we finally made it to the play area, the older kids were busy at play. Once again, Hannah toddled off without so much as a glance back in our direction. She played with the other children for a while, then they headed inside to eat their lunch. Hannah wasn’t bothered, she set about making her own fun while we finished our discussion with the director.

At some point I glanced over at Hannah. She had made her way to the kitchen play area. She was banging away in the sink, then she quickly lifted a spoon to her mouth. I wasn’t bothered, she often pretends to eat from her toy spoons at home. Then I looked a little closer. There was something white in her mouth. I excused myself and walked over to Hannah, who was now happily sitting on the floor. She was clearly munching away at something.

“What do you have in your mouth?” I asked. Hannah looked up and grinned at me. Specks of dirt surrounded her lips. I quickly stuck my fingers into her mouth and retrieved a sizeable pebble.

I hoped that the director hadn’t seen it. This was the best childcare centre that we had visited and the one to which I wanted to send Hannah. I couldn’t stand the thought of her already being labelled as “the rock eater”. Reputations can be hard to shake.



Hannah is more ready for childcare than we possibly could have imagined. In another six months-time she will be even more outgoing and adventurous. It is obvious she thrives on social interactions and imagination-based play. Whereas before I was still quite apprehensive about the idea of sending Hannah to childcare, now I’m almost excited about the prospect.

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The Things We Swore They Would Never Do –…

A wise man once told me that opinions are like anuses – everyone has one. This is especially true of parenting. After all, it’s a task that most of us undertake at some point in our lives.


Sifting through the sea of contradicting opinions is one of the ultimate challenges for any new parent. People are only too willing to drop their two-cents, whether solicited or not. This undoubtedly adds to the complexity of parenting, but these are not the opinions of which you should be most wary. The opinions that I believe can cause you the most problems are your own, pre-child ones.

They are the throw-away lines that you used so freely before you actually had any understanding of the complexity of the job. They are the opinions that escape your mouth as “I’d never let my child…”, often uttered as you witness a single snapshot of another family’s life.

I have done it, many times. Too many to count. I think it’s natural to have an idealistic view of how you expect family life to be before you begin, but it is important to understand that the reality rarely meets your expectations.

The Toys in the Doctor’s Surgery Waiting Room

I had always looked on toys in the doctor’s surgery with disgust. I would never let my child play with them I used to say quietly to myself as I watched children play with the same toys that have sat in the same corner of the surgery waiting room for the past ten years. Just imagine how filthy they are! Imagine how many sick and grubby little fingers have been touching them already. To be honest, the thought of going anywhere near them made me feel a little ill.


Yesterday, we took Hannah to the doctor. She was suffering from what turned out to be conjunctivitis – highly contagious conjunctivitis.

We entered the room and sat down. I sat on the chair and Hannah sat patiently in my lap. She looked around the room and took in the various elements. Her eyes stopped for a while on the television, something that is still very much a novelty for Hannah as we have avoided giving her any screen time at home (yes, I did say I would never let my baby watch the television. So far I have stuck to that one).

After a while, Hannah became bored of the American chat show on the screen and she began scanning the room again. She looked at posters and pamphlets, until eventually her eyes came to rest on the lime-green plastic object in the corner of the room – the toy bucket.


The battle begins…

I still have no idea how Hannah knew what it was, but she definitely knew. Almost immediately she grew restless. Her little legs kicked out and she twisted her body in the usual “let me down” manner. She had a goal in mind – a target that she suddenly had to reach.

Elderly eyes swivelled in the waiting room. A show was about to begin and they would be damned if they were going to miss the fun in their otherwise dull excursion. It was obvious that a battle of willpower was under way – my determination to keep Hannah from the box of disease, and Hannah’s determination to play.


Resigned to defeat

Hannah, of course, had the upper hand. An enthusiastic wail from her and I had to let go. No-one likes to be the parent in the middle of a waiting room commotion, and I’m no exception. To my advantage, Hannah didn’t know that she had this power. She’s never been in the situation where she has had to unleash it, as episodes of public crankiness are few and far between. But I could feel the wail building inside her. I knew I had lost. In that moment I had made the choice – I had become the parent who disgusted me so much in my pre-children days. I had become the parent who let his child play with the toys in the doctor’s surgery waiting room.

I placed her on the floor. I’m sure I gave a head-to-toe shudder as her tiny feet began to carry her towards the dreaded bucket of doom (or fun, depending on by whose viewpoint you look at it).


Saved by an angel

Just then, a voice like an angel from heaven called out “Hannah?”

It was the doctor. It was our turn to see her.

Before Hannah could reach the bucket, I scooped her up into my arms. “Time to see the doctor,” I told her.

It took a moment for it to sink in, but not too long. Hannah’s focus was already onto the next issue – the strange lady in the white coat who seemed entirely too interested in poking and prodding her. But that adventure is a story for another day.


Until next time…

One thing is for sure, Hannah has an excellent memory. I have no doubt that the next time we set foot in that doctor’s surgery waiting room, Hannah’s entire being will become devoted to reaching the bucket. At that moment, I will have little choice but to give in and let her play with the toys. Hopefully, when that time comes, Hannah will not be carrying anything highly contagious. More importantly, hopefully neither will have the last kid to touch them…

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My Sunday Photo – The Shadow of the Swing

My Sunday Photo for this weeks is of a shadow

I have had a busy few weeks, so much so that I didn’t even get around to posting a My Sunday Photo last week. I also haven’t processed any of my photos from this week yet, so I’m cheating a bit and using one of last week’s photos from our park visit – The Shadow of the Swing.

shadow of swing Gough Whitlam Park Swings, baby, swinging, shadow

I love this photo because the shadow perfectly sums up what parks are all about for Hannah at the moment. As far as she’s concerned, if it doesn’t have a swing, it’s not a park worth visiting.

I also like this photo because I don’t post identifying photos of Hannah. A shot like this that captures her in the middle of her favourite activity, while still being completely anonymous, is a rare treat! One I’m very happy to share with you all.

This photo was taken on our recent visit to Gough Whitlam Park, you can read the full review here.

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The Other Children in The Toddler Playground

Now that visits to playgrounds feature heavily in our weekly routine, I’ve begun to notice a few similarities between the children that I see at each playground. As someone who forms his understanding of the world through sweeping generalisations, I have spent my last few visits to playgrounds observing the other children there, and placing them in categories.


The King (or Queen) of the Playground

You know this kid. He’s the one that sits at the top of the slide and doesn’t let anyone else go down. She’s the one who pushes others down the stairs, or hogs a particular piece of equipment all for herself, the entire time you’re at the playground. The ruler of the playground is usually just that little bit older than the rest. He has no ability or desire to share and he becomes extremely agitated when his dominance is challenged.

These kids may appear fearless, even like miniature schoolyard bullies. However, their tough-guy façade tends to crack fairly easily.

Last week Hannah managed to wrestle the baby swing from a helmet-clad toddler who was hell-bent on dominating it, despite the apparent unwillingness of any adult to lift him up and place him inside. He had been holding the damned thing for a full five minutes before Hannah got jack of the situation, toddled over and went head-to-head in a battle of ‘hold and pull’.

This kid had already chased away a grandmother with a small baby, by racing over and yelling “it’s mine” as she attempted to give her granddaughter a quick swing. The poor old darling seemed quite flustered by the interaction.

But he was no match for Hannah. Her tiny hands grasped the black rubber and they refused to budge, despite the young tyrant’s best jerky efforts. “Aw, you’re sharing” I interjected from the sidelines, which no-doubt fuelled his ego-centric rage and resulted in a few more attempts to regain sole control of the contraption. However, he hadn’t counted on the tenacity of a baby girl with surprising strength and a bloody-mindedness for swinging that matched his own. He relented and retreated to the big-kid swing, where he sat sulkily and complained about not being pushed, for the next five minutes while Hannah swung away joyfully. As soon as Hannah alighted, he raced back across and resumed his position at the ‘throne’, much to the dismay of the grandma who was once again hovering hopefully nearby.


The One Who Always Gets Hurt

Just this morning we were at the soft play area in a shopping centre. As I watched Hannah play I noticed a little boy, perhaps three years old, out of the corner of my eye. He was climbing the staircase of a slide, it was no more than a metre high. Somehow, he pulled a backwards summersault off the side and landed face-first on the soft-fall surface. Despite the meagre size of the equipment it really looked quite painful, so much so that I let out an audible gasp. The boy’s father was close by and he rushed to his aide.

Following this adventure, I went for a quick browse of a shop While Emma stayed with Hannah. When I returned just a few minutes later, Emma regaled me with a story of a little boy who had almost taken out Hannah in a spectacular fall off the slide. It felt like déjà vu as I listened. Then Emma pointed out which child it was – the same bloody kid! In the space of ten minutes, the child had managed two life-threatening falls on what must be the safest play equipment in Sydney.

This wasn’t a one-off occurrence either. The other day I watched a kid with his arm already in a sling, majestically pirouette from one stepping-stone to the next, until he gracefully slipped, tumbling head-over-arse and landing on his one good arm. Some kids are just born to have spectacular stacks.


The Nice Kid

I’ll admit it, this one surprised me. I was expecting all other kids at the playground to be self-centred jerks, or at the very least uninterested in the activities of a little baby girl who is just finding her way around. But time and time again, a little darling has absolutely blown me away with his or her generosity or kindness towards Hannah. Every time it has left Hannah with a great big smile on her face, and hopefully taught her a thing or two about positive human interactions.

Several times girls who are a few years older than Hannah, and otherwise alone on the playground, take her under their wing and show her the ropes. They play with her, show her how to do things and even share their toys with her. Hannah, in return beams great big smiles and fully engages in their games.

One child that particularly surprised me recently was a boy of primary school age, who had some of the sweetest interactions with Hannah yet. He had sent his football down a slide and it had rolled off the edge, straight into Hannah. She had looked monetarily shocked, but not upset. He came down the slide after his football and went straight over to Hannah to check on her. Seeing that she was okay, he then offered his football to her to play with. She showed some interest and her interacted with her for quite a while. He even showed her how to use another interesting piece of equipment at the playground. The young boy was so engaging that at one point, another young girl of about Hannah’s age crawled over, and they both sat side-by-side watching the boy. It was really beautiful to watch and I felt such joy that there are kids like that around. It taught me not to be such a cynical old grump.


The One With Parents Permanently Attached

Little Johnny should be able to climb to the top of the slide by himself, after all, he’s six years old. But he can’t, because for his whole life he’s relied on a helicopter ride straight to the top. This kid can’t do anything for himself, and when he is faced with even the slightest glimpse of independence, a parent magically appears with a fresh roll of bubble wrap to protect him from the threat.

Ha has absolutely no social skills, because he hasn’t been provided with the opportunity to develop them. His views about other children range from mild annoyance to bewildered hatred. His parents can often be seen forming a kind of makeshift human barrier between him and the great unwashed.

But all of that is okay, because he’s not going to have to learn how to wipe his own bottom until he leaves for university – he’s living the dream!


The One Without An Owner

You can spot this kid easily. He’s the one hanging upside-down by his ankles from the top of the rope gym when you first arrive. A quick scan of the playground will reveal that there isn’t a parent in sight, yet this kid seems quite at ease. He doesn’t think he owns the playground, he just happens to live there.

These kids come in two flavours – the ones who keep to themselves, and the ones who attach themselves to your family.

The ones who keep to themselves normally drift between the pieces of play equipment, choosing the least populated activity. Sometimes they even scurry off into the bushes for a while, no-doubt seeking some downtime from the hustle and bustle of a busy playground. They re-emerge later, sometimes after several hours – long after you think they’ve gone home.

Then there’s the one who tries to join your family. She just happens to play on the same piece of equipment as your child, and before you know it she’s eaten half your picnic. When you go to leave the park, she’ll look at you as though you’ve just run over her puppy.


The One Who is Stuck

He’s ten centimetres off the ground, but that doesn’t stop him from calling for help to get down. He doesn’t scream at the top of his lungs, instead he opts for the continuous “help, I’m stuck” said at normal speaking volume. He knows someone will come to help, they always do.


The Bolter

This kid has a twinkle in her eye and a penchant for playing on motorways. Her parents have learnt that she can only be taken to fenced play areas, and even then that they need to be constantly alert to the possibility of escape. She can be spotted loitering around the one exit of the playground, just waiting for a careless person to leave the gate open a fraction of a second too long.

Heaven help her parents if they glance at their phone to check an email. It will almost certainly result in a manic chase across at least three lanes of traffic. This child’s parents have the thighs of Usain Bolt and they’re probably quicker off the mark.


The Perfect Child

This is the one who’s behaviour you just can’t fault… you can’t help it that they just happen to be your child…


I’m pretty sure this is the definitive list, but if you happen to spot any other types of children who I’ve neglected to mention, feel free to drop it into the comments. I’ll be sure to keep an eye open for them the next time I’m at the playground.

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